Joe Bartel_8_galaxy

Joe Bartel_8_galaxy
Joe Bartell

cosmicvastness: NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2014 October 1 The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble  The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s nightsky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by ...

Yoshitaka Yasuda

The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble : The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earths night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This sharp close-up of the dying stars nebula was recorded in 2009 by the Hubble Space Telescopes Wide Field Camera 3, and is presented here in reprocessed colors. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot stars dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation of the Scorpion . via NASA

Amber Owens

The Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) from Hubble: Lies about 4000 light years away and can be found in the constellation Scorpion. It has a wing span of 3 light years. Its estimated surface temp of 250,000 degrees C. The dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust.

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The Tulip Nebula by apod.NASA.gov #Astronomy #Tulip_Nebula

NGC 6302 (The Butterfly Nebula): With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the central star of this particular planetary nebula is exceptionally hot -- shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This dramatically detailed close-up of the dying star's nebula was recorded by the newly upgraded Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

Cat's Eye Nebula

The Cat's Eye Nebula from Hubble

The Butterfly Nebula - This sharp and colorful close-up of the dying star's nebula was recorded in 2009 by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3, installed during the final shuttle servicing mission. Image Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

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NGC5461 is identified as a good candidate for hosting a second generation of stars,not yet seen at far-ultraviolet wavelengths.Based on ...

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Source URL: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141001.html
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